take sth away

take sth away
UK US take sth away
Phrasal Verb with take({{}}/teɪk/ verb [T] (took, taken)
to remove something: »

The federal government threatened to take away $1 billion in highway funds.

take sth away from sb/sth »

The amendments are not really taking any power away from the Civil Service.

»

The Bank's rate increases have taken impetus away from housing demand.

to make money from something: »

They will take away $45m if the shares are sold at the top end of the range.

»

After the disposal, the directors took away a combined payoff of £2.9m.

to learn something from an experience or activity: take sth away from sth »

If there is one thing that people should take away from Black Tuesday, it is that we need regulators.

»

What do you hope people will take away from this?

to subtract one number or amount from another: »

200 take away 189 doesn't leave very much!


Financial and business terms. 2012.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • take something away — Brit. another way of saying take something out (sense 2) * * * ˌtake sthaˈway derived 1. to make a feeling, pain, etc. disappear • I was given some pills to take away the pain. 2. (BrE) ( …   Useful english dictionary

  • take sth off — UK US take sth off Phrasal Verb with take({{}}/teɪk/ verb [T] (took, taken) ► WORKPLACE to have a period of time away from work: »After the business trip she took a few days off. »I am definitely looking forward to taking some time off. ► FINANCE …   Financial and business terms

  • ˌtake sth ˈoff — phrasal verb 1) to remove a piece of clothing from your body Ant: put sth on 2) to spend a particular amount of time away from work I m taking Monday off to go to London.[/ex] …   Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • take — take1 W1S1 [teık] v past tense took [tuk] past participle taken [ˈteıkən] ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(action)¦ 2¦(move)¦ 3¦(remove)¦ 4¦(time/money/effort etc)¦ 5¦(accept)¦ 6¦(hold something)¦ 7¦(travel)¦ 8 …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Take — (1) A dealer or customer who agrees to buy at another dealer s offered price is said to take that offer. (2) Also, Euro bankers speak of taking deposits rather than buying money. The New York Times Financial Glossary * * * ▪ I. take take 1 [teɪk] …   Financial and business terms

  • take — (1) To agree to buy. A dealer or customer who agrees to buy at another dealer s offered price is said to take the offer. Bloomberg Financial Dictionary (2) Euro bankers speak of taking deposits rather than buying money. Bloomberg Financial… …   Financial and business terms

  • take — 1 /teIk/ verb past tense took past participle taken MOVE STH 1 (T) to move someone or something from one place to another: Don t forget to take your bag when you go. | Paul doesn t know the way can you take him? | take sb/sth to: We take the kids …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • take*/*/*/ — [teɪk] (past tense took [tʊk] ; past participle taken [ˈteɪkən] ) verb [T] I 1) to move or carry someone or something from one place to another Remember to take a pen with you.[/ex] What time do you take Amy to school?[/ex] The cat had to be… …   Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • tear yourself away (from something) — ˌtear yourself aˈway (from sth) | ˌtear sth aˈway (from sth) derived to leave somewhere even though you would prefer to stay there; to take sth away from somewhere • Dinner s ready, if you can tear yourself away from the TV. • She was unable to… …   Useful english dictionary

  • tear something away (from something) — ˌtear yourself aˈway (from sth) | ˌtear sth aˈway (from sth) derived to leave somewhere even though you would prefer to stay there; to take sth away from somewhere • Dinner s ready, if you can tear yourself away from the TV. • She was unable to… …   Useful english dictionary

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